Renal Society of Australasia

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Renal News

Walking reduces high risk for heart disease in patients with kidney infection
Date: 4 April   Source: News-Medical.net

Heart disease and infection are major complications and the leading causes of death in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is now well established that immune system dysfunction is involved in both of these pathological processes. Specifically, impaired immune function predisposes to infection, while persistent immune activation leads to a state of chronic inflammation that can damage the insides of blood vessels and increase heart disease risk. Physical exercise may confer benefits by exerting anti-inflammatory effects and enhancing immunity, but such effects have been largely unexplored in kidney disease.

Kidney disease patients with poor quality of life at increased risk of developing heart problems
Date: 4 April   Source: News-Medical.net

Kidney disease patients with poor quality of life are at increased risk of experiencing progression of their disease and of developing heart problems, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings suggest that quality of life measurements may have important prognostic value in these individuals.

With no hope of kidney match, woman receives successful transplant
Date: 4 April   Source: HealthCanal

Kimberly Gosell had more than 40 friends and family who were willing to donate a kidney to restore her health — and an immune system primed with harmful antibodies that would damage a new organ from any of them. The 44-year-old mother of two teens had developed high levels of antibodies that attack foreign tissue, causing a positive crossmatch, which made finding a compatible donor for her nearly impossible.

Rapid rise in diabetic kidney disease across Australia
Date: 3 April   Source: ABC Online

ELEANOR HALL: Research released today by Sydney University's Kidney Research Group warns that the increase in diabetes in Australia is having grave consequences for kidney health.

Federal funds finally flow for improved dialyses services
Date: 2 April   Source: ABC Online

Millions of dollars of federal funding has finally been distributed to regional Western Australia to improve dialyses services.

Widely used medicines increase risk of rare kidney disease
Date: 24 March   Source: scoop.co.nz

New Zealanders taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), a type of medicine used to treat gastric acid reflux disorders and peptic ulcer disease, are at an increased risk of a rare kidney disease, according to new findings by University of Otago researchers.

Implementing an IV iron administration protocol within a dialysis organization
Date: 20 March   Source: Nephrology News

This article is part of a special supplement published by Nephrology News & Issues in the February 2014 issue entitled, "Iron therapy and a quarter century of ESAs: What have we learned?"

Minister opens new $5m dialysis unit in Porirua
Date: 20 March   Source: nzDoctor.co.nz

Health Minister Tony Ryall today opened a new $5 million satellite dialysis unit at Keneperu Hospital - greatly improving access to this lifesaving treatment for Greater Wellington communities.

Renal Service Enhances Dialysis Experience for Patients
Date: 17 March   Source: scoop.co.nz

A Tauranga man born with a degenerative kidney condition has praised the Midland Regional Renal Service for improving his quality of life.

Recent recalls and customer alerts for the renal community
Date: 13 March   Source: Nephrology News

Fresenius Medical Care North America had to notify customers of leakage from its Optiflux dialyzers. Model numbers ranged from the F160NRe to the F18Nre in the series; six models total. The company said it had notified customers in February that, in some cases, the dialysate port caps on the hemodialyzer do not form a tight seal when normal torque is applied, "and we advised them that if they encounter a resulting saline leak during pre-treatment priming, they should secure the cap beyond the thread stop," FMCNA spokesperson Jonathan Stone told NN&I. The FDA recall classification does not involve removing any products from the market, said Stone.

Artificial kidney belt may be dialysis game changer
Date: 7 March   Source: ABC News

A Melbourne conference has heard an artificial kidney belt has been approved for human trials in the US. It would release dialysis patients from the routine of being hooked up to a dialysis machine at a clinic and Kidney Health Australia says it would also be cheaper for the health system.

Baxter initiates voluntary recall of one lot of peritoneal dialysis solution
Date: 6 March   Source: Nephrology News

Baxter International Inc. has initiated a voluntary recall in the United States of a single lot of DIANEAL PD-2 Peritoneal Dialysis Solution with 1.5% Dextrose 6000mL (Ambu-Flex II) to the hospital/user level. The recall is being initiated as a result of complaints of particulate matter, identified as mold, resulting from a leak in the container.

The FDA's proposed nutrition label changes could help kidney disease patients, those at risk
Date: 6 March   Source: Nephrology News

The National Kidney Foundation said in a March 5 blog post that it supports the U.S Food and Drug Administration's proposed nutrition label changes. The proposed changes would put a greater emphasis on calories, highlight added sugars, and give exact amounts of certain nutrients, including potassium and calcium.

Cell-cycle arrest biomarkers validated for acute kidney injury
Date: 5 March   Source: News-Medical.net

Saeed A. Jortani, Ph.D., associate clinical professor in the University of Louisville's Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, headed up one of three labs in the United States involved in determining two new markers for acute kidney injury (AKI). The research group's paper, "Validation of Cell-Cycle Arrest Biomarkers for Acute Kidney Injury Using Clinical Adjudication," was posted online Feb. 25 by the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Blood pressure-reducing diet may also diminish kidney stone risk
Date: 4 March   Source: Nephrology News

A diet high in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts, moderate in low-fat dairy products, and low in animal proteins, refined grains and sweets may reduce risk for developing kidney stones, according to a study published in the March issue of the National Kidney Foundation's American Journal of Kidney Diseases. March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation encourages people to learn about the kidneys and associated conditions, including kidney stones.

 YVETTE BATTEN / Fairfax NZ Kidney recipient eternally grateful
Date: 3 March   Source: Taranaki Daily News

Erana Hoskin knows the value of organ donation. In 2011 she got the call to say a kidney and pancreas donor had been found for her. "I got the call probably 11 o'clock at night," she said. "I had to be in Auckland by 5 o'clock the next morning."

 

Sanil Kumar has a wek to leave the country. Photo / Richard Robinson Visa refusal condemns me to death, says kidney patient
Date: 28 February   Source: NZ Herald

A Fijian migrant who needs a life-saving kidney transplant says he has been given a "death sentence" by immigration officials who will deport him if he does not leave New Zealand.

Kidney recipient calls for organ donation to become mandatory
Date: 23 February   Source: Daily Telegraph

A KIDNEY transplant recipient about to celebrate the 30th anniversary of her surgery has called for organ donation to become mandatory.

Dialysis project is given glowing report
Date: 19 February   Source: ABC Online

MARK COLVIN: Kidney dialysis is a hard slog at the best of times. For many Australian dialysis patients, though, it's even harder: they're Aboriginal people living in remote communities. For them, dialysis can involve journeys of hundreds of kilometres, and other difficulties.

Study finds intensive dialysis in pregnant women with kidney failure benefits mother and baby
Date: 17 February   Source: Nephrology News

Intensive dialysis treatments in pregnant women with kidney failure lead to a higher proportion of live births than standard dialysis care, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. The findings suggest that more frequent and longer dialysis sessions should be considered for dialysis patients of childbearing age who want to become pregnant or who are already pregnant.

Study finds surprising kidney attack death toll
Date: 12 February   Source: ABC Online

MARK COLVIN: Which would you say kills more people? Heart attacks or kidney attacks? Most people would imagine it would be the heart, but they'd be wrong. A new study has found that only a third of acute kidney attack patients are still alive three-and-a-half years after diagnosis. About 50,000 Australians suffer acute kidney attacks each year.

Mouse study shows toxin in seafood causes kidney damage at levels considered safe for consumption
Date: 11 February   Source: Nephrology News

A chemical that can accumulate in seafood and is known to cause brain damage is also toxic to the kidneys, but at much lower concentrations, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.The findings suggest that officials may need to reconsider what levels of the toxin are safe for human consumption.

FDA approves trial for wearable artificial kidney
Date: 10 February   Source: Nephrology News

ATLANTA — The U.S. Food & Drug Administration has approved the start of the first human clinical trials in the United States for the wearable artificial kidney designed by Beverly Hills, Calif.-based Blood Purification Technologies Inc. The announcement was made by Victor Gura, MD, during the opening session on Sunday of the Annual Dialysis Conference taking place in Atlanta.

Study looks at effects of exercise on heart health in patients with chronic kidney disease
Date: 11 February   Source: News-Medical.net

A Leicester doctor has become the first renal physician in the country to be awarded the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinician Scientist Award. The fellowship, worth more than £1 million, will fund a five-year study into the effects of exercise on heart disease in patients with chronic kidney disease who are on dialysis.

Canada Guidelines Call for Kidney Dialysis Delay
Date: 3 February   Source: Medscape

Symptoms and complications should weigh more heavily than laboratory tests in deciding when to initiate dialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease, according to new guidelines from the Canadian Society of Nephrology.

ABC The new mobile renal dialysis truck at its official opening in Adelaide. It will visit remote communities in South Australia's outback. New mobile dialysis truck to visit kidney disease patients in outback SA
Date: 30 January   Source: 7News

The South Australian Government says a new mobile dialysis truck will provide a better level of service to Aboriginal kidney disease patients in South Australia's outback.

Growing transplant tissue 'a step closer', according to Nature article
Date: 29 January   Source: News.com.au

SCIENTISTS have found a way to turn animal cells back to a youthful, neutral state, a feat hailed as a "game-changer'' in growing transplant tissue. The research, reported in the journal Nature, could be the third great advance in stem cells - a futuristic field that aims to reverse Alzheimer's, cancer and other crippling or lethal diseases.

Fresenius clarifies recall of hemodialysis machines
Date: 17 January   Source: Nephrology News

Fresenius Medical Care North America clarified the class II recall of its 2008 Series dialysis machines. FMCNA told NN&I that, in November 2013, it notified customers that it had received reports of the saline bag on its hemodialysis machines inappropriately filling during priming and recirculation of the extracorporeal circuit.

Researchers find metabolic clues to diabetic kidney failure
Date: 16 January   Source: Nephrology News

About 33% of people with type 2 diabetes suffer kidney damage that progresses to end-stage renal disease. Scientists have thought that this kidney disease is driven by damage to the glomeruli, blood vessels in the kidney, which spill the protein albumin into the urine. Current treatments targeting the resulting "albuminuria" do not prevent kidney failure. However, a new study by Joslin Diabetes Center researchers that compares the metabolic fingerprints of patients who develop ESRD versus those who don't has furnished new clues to the disease, the researchers announced.

SA Opposition pledges to fund permanent dialysis facilities on APY Lands
Date: 24 January   Source: ABC Online

As the rate of chronic kidney disease in remote indigenous areas continues to rise, so too does the number of patients having to leave their families for treatment hundreds of kilometres away.

New study examines factors that may lead to end stage renal disease
Date: 15 January   Source: News-Medical.net

About 33 percent of people with type 2 diabetes suffer kidney damage that progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), at which point they require either dialysis or kidney transplantation. Scientists have thought that this kidney disease is driven by damage to the glomeruli, blood vessels in the kidney, which spill the protein albumin into the urine. Current treatments targeting the resulting "albuminuria" do not prevent kidney failure.

Researchers generate kidney tubular cells from stem cells
Date: 30 December   Source: Nephrology News

Researchers have successfully coaxed stem cells to become kidney tubular cells. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The researchers said their findings are a significant advance toward one day using regenerative medicine, which involves rebuilding or repairing tissues and organs, to treat kidney failure, rather than the current method of dialysis or transplantation.

 Relieved parents Shane and Roslyn Watson with Cooper at the Mater Hospital after the Life-saving transplant. Pic Annette Dew Source: News Limited Grateful family gets their Christmas wish as baby Cooper gets life-saving kidney, while another family grieves
Date: 26 December   Source: news.com.au

A MACKAY family will say a prayer and light a candle every Christmas for the stranger who saved their baby's life this week. Thirteen-month-old Cooper Watson is recovering in the Mater Children's Hospital in Brisbane after receiving the most precious of Christmas gifts - a donated kidney.

Melissa Little (left) and Jessica Vanslambrouck are part of a team of bioscientists who have grown a human kidney from stem cells. Source: Supplied UQ scientists grow kidney from stem cells
Date: 16 December   Source: The Australian

AUSTRALIAN scientists say they have made the first complex human organ produced from stem cells, after growing a tiny kidney in a laboratory dish.

Antihypertensives associated with lower dialysis risk for patients with advanced CKD
Date: 17 December   Source: Nephrology News

Patients with stable hypertension and the most advanced stage of chronic kidney disease before initiating dialysis appeared to have a lower risk for long-term dialysis or death if they were treated with the antihypertensive drugs known as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Physical Activity May Slow Kidney Function Decline in Patients With Kidney Disease
Date: 12 December   Source: Science Daily

Increased physical activity may slow kidney function decline in patients with kidney disease, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings suggest that exercise could have a powerful effect on maintaining patients' health.

Acute kidney injury may be more deadly than heart attacks
Date: 6 December   Source: Nephrology News

Acute kidney injury may be more deadly than a heart attack, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The findings suggest that follow-up and surveillance may be critical to protect the health of individuals who develop this form of kidney damage. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an abrupt decline in kidney function that often arises after major surgeries or severe infections.

Study shows how certain measures can help predict older dialysis patients' prognoses
Date: 22 November   Source: Nephrology News

New study findings indicate that most adults over 67 initiate chronic dialysis in the hospital, and those who have a prolonged hospital stay and receive other forms of life support around the time of dialysis initiation have limited survival and more intensive use of subsequent healthcare.

Minister visits new $1.7m renal unit in Hastings
Date: 22 November   Source: voxy.co.nz

Health Minister Tony Ryall today visited Hawke's Bay's new $1.7 million dialysis unit which is giving more patients access to this life sustaining treatment.

Early data show potential for investigational bioengineered blood vessel as dialysis grafts
Date: 21 November   Source: Nephrology News

An investigational, manufactured blood vessel used in vascular grafts for dialysis patients show encouraging early results among study patients in Poland, according to preliminary data reported Nov. 20 by a researcher at Duke Medicine.

Fighting for life
Date: 21 November   Source: stuff.co.nz

Sanil Kumar has just a few weeks to raise funds which could determine whether he lives or dies. The Glendene resident, who is originally from Fiji and has been working in New Zealand since 2010, had his visa declined in July.

Renal artery stents lead to similar outcome versus medication-only
Date: 21 November   Source: Nephrology News

A commonly used stenting procedure to treat plaque build-up in the renal artery appears to offer no significant improvement when added to medication-based therapy, according to results from a National Institutes of Health-funded study. The narrowing and hardening of one or both renal arteries, known as renal artery stenosis, occurs in 1 to 5% of people who have hypertension. The findings were presented at the American Heart Association 2013 Scientific Sessions in Dallas and appeared concurrently in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Rheumatoid arthritis drug shows promise as targeted treatment for serious kidney disease
Date: 18 November   Source: Nephrology News

A drug approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may also turn out to be the first targeted therapy for one of the most common forms of kidney disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), according to research published online in New England Journal of Medicine.

Renal Stenting Does Not Improve Outcomes for Renal Artery Stenosis Patients
Date: 18 November   Source: Sciency Daily

According to the findings from a national research trial, people who suffer from a narrowing of the arteries that lead to the kidneys, or renal artery stenosis, do not experience better outcomes when renal stenting is used. Instead, a comprehensive regimen of drug and medical therapies works just as well. The national study, which was led by Rhode Island Hospital researchers Lance Dworkin, MD, and Timothy Murphy, MD, in collaboration with multiple investigators worldwide, is published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). They will also present the results at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association on November 18.

Researchers find drug that could halt kidney failure
Date: 15 November   Source: Harvard Gazette

A drug approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may also turn out to be the first targeted therapy for one of the most common forms of kidney disease, a condition that almost inevitably leads to kidney failure.

Starting Dialysis After Conception May Improve Birth Rates
Date: 14 November   Source: Science Daily

Nov. 14, 2013 — Women with advanced kidney disease who start dialysis during pregnancy have superior live birth rates than those already on dialysis at the time of conception, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The findings provide valuable information for counseling women with kidney disease who are of child-bearing age.

Certain antihypertensive medications are better at preventing cardiovascular disease in dialysis patients than others
Date: 13 November   Source: Nephrology News

Among dialysis patients with hypertension and thickened heart muscles, certain antihypertensive medications are better than others for preventing cardiovascular disease and hospitalizations, according to an abstract, "Hypertension in Hemodialysis Patients Treated with Atenolol or Lisinopril (HDPAL): A Randomized Controlled Trial" (Abstract 5826), presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney week 2013. A team led by Rajiv Agarwal, MD, MBBS, FASN, from the VA Medical Center in Indianapolis, conducted a clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of an ACE inhibitor–based antihypertensive treatment compared with a ß-blocker-based antihypertensive treatment. Two hundred patients on hemodialysis who had hypertension and thickened heart muscles were randomized to the ACE inhibitor lisinopril or the ß-blocker atenolol, each administered three times weekly after dialysis.

Combining blood pressure drugs inked to serious side effects in type 2 diabetes patients
Date: 13 November   Source: Nephrology News

Combining blood pressure–lowering drugs can cause serious side effects in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderately decreased kidney function, according to a late breaking poster, Combined Angiotensin Inhibition for Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy: VA Nephron D (Abstract 5780), presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2013.

Intervention that helps prevent acute kidney injury might not improve long term kidney function as well
Date: 13 November   Source: Nephrology News

An intervention that reduces the risk of acute kidney injury may not necessarily improve surgery patients' long-term kidney function, according to an abstract presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2013, "Acute Kidney Injury from Off-Pump or On-Pump Coronary Bypass Grafting and Kidney Function One Year Later (Abstract 5812)."

Australia ranks 21st for organ donation
Date: 12 November   Source: The Australian

ORGAN donation in Australia is way behind the world leaders, according to international rankings that put the country in 21st place.

Acid levels in the diet could have profound effects on kidney health
Date: 11 November   Source: Nephrology News

Three new studies suggest that controlling dietary acid intake could help improve kidney health. Results of these studies were presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5-1.

Defining key elements in promoting peritoneal dialysis to patients
Date: 11 November   Source: Nephrology News

The Medicare program has offered dialysis providers financial incentives to place more patients on peritoneal dialysis. But nephrologists need to know more about the modality option to make for a smooth transition. At the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week session, "Moving the field forward in PD" on Nov. 7, speakers offered ideas on how to expand the reach of the modality and improve technique survival.

Levels of BPA in components of dialysis machines may be toxic to patients' immune cells
Date: 8 November   Source: News-Medical.net

Levels of bisphenol A (BPA) in components of dialysis machines may be toxic to the immune cells circulating in kidney failure patients' blood, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5-10 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA.

Consuming more vegetable protein may help kidney disease patients live longer
Date: 11 November   Source: Nephrology News

Increased consumption of vegetable protein was linked with prolonged survival among kidney disease patients in a new a study. The study, "Higher Intake of Vegetable Protein Is Associated with Lower All-Cause Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease" (Abstract 4058), will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5 to 10 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta.

Study: Improved testing technique could detect parathyroid hormone imbalances in dialysis patients
Date: 31 October   Source: Nephrology News

A new testing method can better detect potentially fatal parathyroid hormone imbalances in patients with end-stage renal disease, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Photo: Indigenous patients have been able to return to the Kimberley for dialysis treatment. Indigenous dialysis patients return to the Kimberley after the roll-out of renal units
Date: 31 October   Source: Nephrology News

More than 30 kidney dialysis patients have been able to return home to the Kimberley in recent months, with the roll-out of three new renal units.

Study: Enzyme restores kidney function in diabetic kidney disease
Date: 28 October   Source: Nephrology News

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that, while a prevailing theory suggests elevated cellular levels of glucose ultimately result in diabetic kidney disease, the truth may, in fact, be quite the opposite. The findings could fundamentally change understanding of how diabetes-related diseases develop—and how they might be better treated, the study authors said.

Study examines role of urate-lowering therapy on renal function in patients with hyperuricemia
Date: 28 October   Source: News-Medical.net

Urate-lowering therapy alone may not directly reduce the risk of kidney disease in those with hyperuricemia. However, according to a study presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego, working to lower serum uric acid based on the 2012 American College of Rheumatology Guidelines for Management of Gout has a positive effect.

Paying living donors for kidney transplantation could result in incremental cost savings
Date: 25 October   Source: News-Medical.net

A strategy where living kidney donors are paid $10,000, with the assumption that this strategy would increase the number of transplants performed by 5% or more, would be less costly and more effective than the current organ donation system, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The findings demonstrate that a paid living donor strategy is attractive from a cost-effectiveness perspective, even under conservative estimates of its effectiveness.

Study affirms safety profile of Rockwell's iron replacement drug for dialysis patients
Date: 22 October   Source: Nephrology News

Rockwell Medical Inc. said its investigational iron-replacement drug Triferic, previously known as Soluble Ferric Pyrophosphate (SFP), has received positive results in a study designed to test its safety. The study was performed as part of the company's new drug application for Triferic, which is indicated for chronic kidney disease patients receiving dialysis.

Dialysis while sleeping improves kidney health and decreases risk of heart disease
Date: 18 October   Source: News-Medical.net

Receiving dialysis at home while sleeping not only improves kidney health and quality of life for people with kidney disease, it could also decrease their risk of heart disease, says new study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease
Date: 16 October   Source: Nephrology News

Patients with psoriasis, particularly those with severe disease, are at greater risk of developing moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease, according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal. Those with severe psoriasis were nearly twice as likely to develop chronic kidney disease and were more than four times as likely to develop end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis.

Woman's life saved by five-week-old kidney donor
Date: 15 October   Source: Melbourne Herald-Sun

AN INFANT just five weeks old has saved a woman dying of kidney failure. The tiny organs were transplanted into Samira Kauser after the child died of heart failure, making the infant the youngest organ donor in Britain.

Baby kidneys successfully transplanted in adult woman
Date: 14 October   Source: ABC Online

ELEANOR HALL: A shortage of organ donors in Britain has prompted UK surgeons to embark on a difficult task. They're asking parents whose babies die before they're two months old to consider donating the infant's organs.

Behavioral therapy during dialysis sessions might combat depression among kidney failure patients, study shows
Date: 14 October   Source: Nephrology News

Behavioral therapy provided chair-side to kidney failure patients while they're undergoing dialysis may help fight depression and improve patients' quality of life, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Suppression of mitochondria: A dominant feature of diabetic kidney disease
Date: 11 October   Source: News-Medical.net

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified 13 metabolites - small molecules produced by cellular metabolism - that are significantly different in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease compared to healthy controls.

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